Novartis

Novartis

Novartis

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Novartis

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Oeflingerstrasse 44
D-79664 Wehr, Germany

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Description

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Position on the value chain

With the ultimate aim to create a European alliance for bioproduction in Europe, organisations have joined forces with COBIOE. Discover who are our associates.

Bio-resources and biobanking
  • Cells, tissues and humanized xeno-organs
  • Biosamples
  • Viral, phage or bacterial specimen
Identification of biotherapies
  • Target identification
  • Target validation
  • Screening
Drug design
  • Drug assessment
  • Drug engineering
  • In vitro preclinical studies
Clinical validation
  • Clinical trials
  • In vivo preclinical validation
  • Pre-industrial scale production
Production
  • Upstream processes
  • Downstream processes
  • Quality control
Market access
  • CE mark / market authorisation
  • Payment / Reimbursement
  • Care pathways

Novartis last news

07/11/2023

CA 125 Test Industry to Develop New Growth Story | BD (U.S.), Amgen Inc (U.S.), Pfizer Inc (U.S.) - Argyle Report

[...] Report Description: Market Intelx has recently published a market research report namely CA 125 Test Market that contains important statistical and analytical data spread through the entirety of the report and includes contents related to the industry. The repor [...]

17/07/2023

50 Docs and Reps at the DOC: An important, not to mention trendy, "international" show in Germany

DOC stands for the International Congress of Germany Ophthalmic Surgery, or in German, Internationaler Kongress der Deutschen Ophthalmochirurgie. And for... The post 50 Docs and Reps at the DOC: An important, not to mention trendy, "international" show in Germany appeared first on CAKE .

04/04/2023

A Novel Alu Element Insertion in ATM Induces Exon Skipping in Suspected HBOC Patients

The vast majority of patients at risk of hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome remain without a molecular diagnosis after routine genetic testing. One type of genomic alteration that is commonly missed by diagnostic pipelines is mobile element insertions (MEIs). Here, we reanalyzed multigene panel data from suspected HBOC patients using the MEI detection tool Mobster. A novel Alu element insertion in ATM intron 54 (ATM:c.8010+30_8010+31insAluYa5) was identified as a potential contributing factor in seven patients. Transcript analysis of patient-derived RNA from three heterozygous carriers revealed exon 54 skipping in 38% of total ATM transcripts. To manifest the direct association between the Alu element insertion and the aberrant splice pattern, HEK293T and MCF7 cells were transfected with wild-type or Alu element-carrying minigene constructs. On average, 77% of plasmid-derived transcripts lacked exon 54 in the presence of the Alu element insertion compared to only 4.7% of transcripts expressed by the wild-type minigene. These results strongly suggest ATM:c.8010+30_8010+31insAluYa5 as the main driver of ATM exon 54 skipping. Since this exon loss is predicted to cause a frameshift and a premature stop codon, mutant transcripts are unlikely to translate into functional proteins. Based on its estimated frequency of up to 0.05% in control populations, we propose to consider ATM:c.8010+30_8010+31insAluYa5 in suspected HBOC patients and to clarify its role in carcinogenesis through future epidemiological and functional analyses. Generally, the implementation of MEI detection tools in diagnostic sequencing pipelines could increase the diagnostic yield, as MEIs are likely underestimated contributors to genetic diseases.