IBB

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IBB

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Bundesallee 210
10719 Berlin, Germany

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Position on the value chain

With the ultimate aim to create a European alliance for bioproduction in Europe, organisations have joined forces with COBIOE. Discover who are our associates.

Bio-resources and biobanking
  • Cells, tissues and humanized xeno-organs
  • Biosamples
  • Viral, phage or bacterial specimen
Identification of biotherapies
  • Target identification
  • Target validation
  • Screening
Drug design
  • Drug assessment
  • Drug engineering
  • In vitro preclinical studies
Clinical validation
  • Clinical trials
  • In vivo preclinical validation
  • Pre-industrial scale production
Production
  • Upstream processes
  • Downstream processes
  • Quality control
Market access
  • CE mark / market authorisation
  • Payment / Reimbursement
  • Care pathways

IBB last news

25/01/2024

Six Weeks Countdown to the International Cellulose Fibres Conference, 13-14 March 2024, in Cologne and Online

In just six weeks, the cellulose fibre industry will gather in Cologne for a unique conference exploring the latest advancements in eco fibres. Hosted both in person in Cologne and virtually online, the event will delve into the sustainable future of textiles, emphasizing the shift from non-renewable to renewable fibres. The conference, scheduled for 13 [...]

25/01/2024

Impact of Khat Chewing on Serum Uric Acid and Albuminuria Levels in Yemeni Type II Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Background: Diabetes mellitus is the major cause of end-stage renal disease and is a common endocrine illness defined by chronic hyperglycemia. In addition to diabetes, substance addiction is considered to be a cause of renal issues. The World Health Organization has classed khat (Catha edulis) as an illicit substance. Khat interferes with regular physiological activities, which may have negative health impacts on organs and systems.  Objectives: To determine the effect of khat and uric acid on nephropathy in type II diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: This is an analytical, cross-sectional study that was conducted on 215 males aged 35 to 55 years who had previously been diagnosed with type II diabetes mellitus and were visiting AL- Thawra General Hospital in Ibb City. The diabetic person was corresponded in age and BMI by the control participant. The subjects were divided into two groups. There were 105 people with type II diabetes mellitus (59% chewing Khat and 46% not chewing Khat), 110 people were healthy and did not have type II diabetes (44% of them chewed Khat and 66% did not chew Khat).  Results: A significant increase in albuminuria and proteinuria within the normal range in the diabetes mellitus Khat Chewer group compared to the diabetes mellitus Non-Khat Chewer group (p˂0.001). However, no significant differences were seen in the healthy control group. Conclusion: Khat chewing has a strong effect on those with type II diabetes and increases the progression of kidney nephropathy. There was an association between khat chewing and higher uric acid levels in both diabetic and non-diabetic patients.

24/01/2024

Research explains why protein-poor diet during pregnancy increases risk of prostate cancer in offspring

Experiments with rats conducted by researchers at São Paulo State University (UNESP) in Brazil increase our understanding of why descendants of women who were malnourished during pregnancy tend to face a higher risk of prostate cancer in adulthood.