CYTOO

Startup

CYTOO

Description

Cytoo develops physiologically-relevant cellular models and assays for High Content Screening (HCS).

CYTOO

Address

7 PARVIS LOUIS NEEL GRENOBLE38000 FRANCE
grenoble, France

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Description

Cytoo develops physiologically-relevant cellular models and assays for High Content Screening (HCS).

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With the ultimate aim to create a European alliance for bioproduction in Europe, organisations have joined forces with COBIOE. Discover who are our associates.

Bio-resources and biobanking
  • Cells, tissues and humanized xeno-organs
  • Biosamples
  • Viral, phage or bacterial specimen
Identification of biotherapies
  • Target identification
  • Target validation
  • Screening
Drug design
  • Drug assessment
  • Drug engineering
  • In vitro preclinical studies
Clinical validation
  • Clinical trials
  • In vivo preclinical validation
  • Pre-industrial scale production
Production
  • Upstream processes
  • Downstream processes
  • Quality control
Market access
  • CE mark / market authorisation
  • Payment / Reimbursement
  • Care pathways

TRL

CYTOO last news

21/05/2024

Here's what France's foreign investment push delivered for R&D

French President Emmanuel Macron speaking at the Choose France 2024 summit. Photo: Élysée – Présidence de la République française Last week, companies committed to investing €15 billion in France, including funding for health and battery research and development. The boost in industrial R&D investment is good news for France's researchers and innovators, with collaboration a key component of the strategies of these multinationals, as they seek to take advantage of France's public support for research and vibrant tech ecosystem. Other commitments could benefit innovators indirectly, by boosting France's digital infrastructure and industrial capacity. For instance, Microsoft and Amazon announced significant investments in cloud infrastructure and artificial intelligence. Meanwhile, Swiss company KL1 is to build a €300 nickel refining plant, a key material for manufacturing cathodes for batteries. The government says its success in attracting foreign direct investment is a result of an attractive fiscal policy, investment in innovation, regulatory simplification and a clear green transition strategy. Last year, France registered 1,815 foreign direct investment projects, many of which are contributing to the country's push for leadership in decarbonation, digitalisation and tech. Decarbonisation projects alone made up 205, or 11% of last year's investments. France was the number one European country for foreign direct investment in 2023 for the firth year running, according to an audit from consulting firm EY. The country has capitalised on the “triple effect of reforms, making up for investments that hadn't been made for two decades, and the even more complex situation of our competitors,” the report says. Pfizer to invest in clinical research and manufacturing Pfizer plans to invest €500 million in the health sector over five years, to develop both its research and development and manufacturing capacity in France. It will mean stepping up research collaborations and clinical trials in fields including oncology and haematology. The company is advancing treatments for multiple myeloma and the hereditary blood disorder sickle cell anaemia. Around 40% of Pfizer's R&D efforts are directed towards cancer treatments, a field where collaboration is essential, said Reda Guiha, president of Pfizer France. “In recent years France has developed a solid biopharmaceutical ecosystem, which especially drives innovation in oncology,” he said. Alexandre de Germay, the company's executive vice president, said France is attracting investment because it “continues investing in life sciences and demonstrates an ability to collaborate to actively research new solutions, and develop expertise and innovative scientific approaches.” The latest announcement followed commitments in 2022 and 2023 to invest €1.2 billion in France. Pfizer says it is ahead of schedule with this and has already allocated more than €730 million to projects including: €90 million for clinical trials in oncology, rare diseases, and inflammation and immunology. €280 million for R&D partnerships with French biotech companies including Valneva, ImCheck Therapeutics, and Cytoo, and with the BioLabs Hôtel-Dieu incubator. This includes €80 million allocated to French venture capital funds to finance biotech companies €350 million to boost production capacities, including active pharmaceutical ingredients for which Europe is heavily reliant on imports Bringing battery R&D to France Estonia's next-generation battery manufacturer Skeleton Technologies promised to spend €600 million in France over the next five years, including setting up an R&D centre in Toulouse. “This will allow us to accelerate the development of next-generation battery technologies through collaboration with the best experts in battery, materials, and energy storage, and build our next factory specifically dedicated to our SuperBattery product,” said Taavi Madiberk, CEO and co-founder of Skeleton Technologies. France has a growing battery market, and last year inaugurated the first of four planned gigafactories to make batteries for electric vehicles. The plant is run by Automotive Cells Company, a joint venture of Stellantis, TotalEnergies and Mercedes. In a greener future, producing European batteries will be a major factor in ensuring the bloc's strategic autonomy. Skeleton Technologies makes high-power, fast-charging batteries, called SuperBattery for use in energy storage, powering heavy-duty and utility vehicles, data centres, rail, marine, automotive, space and aeronautics. These do not require nickel or cobalt from outside Europe and instead use a patented form of graphene that is produced in Europe. Business France has been trying to convince the company to expand to France since 2020, as part of the country's strategy to become a leader in green industries.  “This patient work was one of the determining factors in the company's choice in favour of France,” said Laurent Saint-Martin, managing director of Business France. The new R&D centre is the first phase of the company's French expansion, due to start at the end of the year. The next one will be a manufacturing facility for Skeleton's high-power batteries. AI boost for start-ups The largest commitment of €4 million came from Microsoft, its most significant investment in France to date. While much of this will go towards data centres, Microsoft will also launch an initiative to help start-ups adopt generative AI and identify new applications. The company is aiming to accelerate 2,500 French start-ups by 2027 through its Microsoft GenAI Studio programme. It will start with a 4-month programme at the Station F start-up incubator in Paris, welcoming 15 start-ups twice a year, beginning in September, before expanding across the country. “Microsoft will not only leverage its own expertise but that of its extensive AI network for the studio. This is a huge milestone for our start-ups and our campus,” said Roxanne Varza, director of Station F. IBM committed €45 million to introduce quantum computing at its Paris-Saclay research lab, which has focused on AI since its creation in 2019. The company said it would collaborate with businesses, universities and research institutes on projects related to algorithms, as well as the use of quantum computing in finance, AI, chemistry and other areas. The new wave of investments will also see innovative technologies reach industrial scale. FertigHy, a pan-European company co-founded by EIT InnoEnergy, has chosen northern France as the site for its first low-carbon fertiliser plant, initially planned for Spain. Construction is expected to begin in 2027 and last until 2030, when it will begin producing fertilisers using hydrogen made from renewable and low-carbon electricity. German aviation firm Lilium meanwhile is in talks with the French government to invest up to €400 million in a new factory to produce its electric aircraft. Discussions are expected to conclude in the coming weeks once a site, possibly in Nouvelle Aquitaine, has been selected. “Lilium is attracted by France's well-established aerospace industry, expertise in electric mobility, highly skilled workforce, and supportive government environment,” the company said.